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Life Lesson from Cricket-20

“Just see the birds again”, Aki urged the group, “And see the men and women rushing in their four wheelers outside. What a gulf of difference, the birds retiring seem to be in total rhythm with nature, isn’t it?”

“I swear I saw some of the crows even smile”, Shyam dramatically reacted to Aki’s description. Meanwhile, as the birds cuddled on their fragile nests that along with the branch and the whole fig tree itself, swung gracefully to the south west winds. The cars below however shook Venky; his heart skipped a beat as the vehicles vying for space on a narrow street raced to beat the traffic lights.

“I am sure I hear some of these people even swear at each other”, Venky spoke echoing Aki’s descriptions “see their faces gripped with an unknown fear, and an undefined stress. It’s totally out of sync with nature.”

Aki spoke on, “The south Mumbai traffic rushes back to the suburbs now and while the birds peacefully sleep at night, the humans drown themselves in a whole lot of activity to forget their day’s sorrows. There are the movies, the bars, and the internet, the facebook and the whatsapp and all that myriad distractions. I wonder if this isn’t a desperate attempt to avoid connecting to our own selves. Living in harmony with nature seems to be a rich luxury that while humans can ill afford to have, the birds have earned it free of cost. And we never tire to pompously declare that the humans are the most advanced of all species of life.”

“Do you guys remember our annual pilgrimage to Vrindavan a few years ago?”

The three nodded. How could they ever forget these yatras for the three of them oversaw the accommodation, travel and food arrangements for the thousands of families that participated in these two week spiritual retreats.

“The managers were racking their brains on how they could organize lunch serving for four thousand plus members of our congregation without agitating the monkeys. The monkeys seem to be everywhere in Vrindavan, and they are notorious in grabbing food, and even other possessions of humans like glasses, purses, and handbags, all in a desperate attempt to get some food. But this worry never bothered you guys, our yatra bosses during dinner time. None of the monkeys would venture near the kitchen area, not one monkey came to snatch the dinner plate or any other eatable from any of our members. In fact there was no security during dinner time, and the monkeys, if they wanted to, could have worked a few extra hours and grabbed a big feast. But the arrival of sunset, and they have a strong discipline; they unfailingly switch off all their activities. No temptations of food could deter them from their happy rest”

The three of them spontaneously laughed. The monkeys had indeed remained quiet during dinner, but the purport that Aki made now never occurred to the trio.

“Ironically in Mumbai, as the neon signs on the road get activated, and the clock strikes seven p.m, humans, in stark contrast to the uncivilized monkeys, passionately busy themselves in a whole lot of activities. And as the birds happily wake to greet the rising sun, the pinkish hue of the early daylight, the gentle breeze from the ocean and the fragrance of the kadamba flowers is lost to the humans. We have no time to admire the sunrise or ponder over where our life is heading, as the challenges of yet another day stares at our face. We rush to work, grabbing a sandwich, and munching or even swallowing it while simultaneously reading the paper, answering the mails, talking to our spouse, and dressing ourselves. And then if you do feel peaceful walking on the sea shore, or stroll in a natural forest like what we are doing, that’s dismissed as a mere aberration.

“The whole world outside of our ashram is busy earning money, and they’d goad you on to join the mad rat race. And surely you wouldn’t want to feel guilty for not being part of it. But who’s winning this race? Who cares! Just keep running, and even if you win you still remain a rat. Or maybe a rat is better off; he’s got to worry only the cat, but we have to worry hundreds of other predators- the two legged, well dressed, sophisticated, and polished humans.”

Venky and others shared a prolonged silence. Slowly they rose and walked to the bus stop. They were now retreating back to the monastery. As half dozen parrots flew back to their giant residence at the peepal, the light grey barks rustled at the slightest breeze. Venky looked up at the birds and spoke aloud to no one in particular, “I think this is a beautiful dance. The birds surely have an affluent life in South Mumbai.”

“I am remembering Mr Parekh; maybe like the Buddha who attained enlightenment also under the peepal tree, he could spend some time contrasting his life with these simple birds; surely they could teach us a valuable lesson in simple and happy living”

To be continued…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments (1)

  1. PAWAN SAHANI says:

    Hare Krishna, Prabhuji I liked that article Where Sachin initially loved to play Cricket in his younger age and later on, the people had huge expectations from him, so he started playing with their expectations, Similarly in our Spiritual life also, Great leaders have to be conscious they should love what they do throughout, after Spending sometime they should not render service to meet people expectations, but they should serve because they love to. Hope this was the last part from Life lessons from Cricket, now heading to read Love Story in Monastery.

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Life Lesson from Cricket-20

“Just see the birds again”, Aki urged the group, “And see the men and women rushing in their four wheelers outside. What a gulf of difference, the birds retiring seem to be in total rhythm with nature, isn’t it?”

“I swear I saw some of the crows even smile”, Shyam dramatically reacted to Aki’s description. Meanwhile, as the birds cuddled on their fragile nests that along with the branch and the whole fig tree itself, swung gracefully to the south west winds. The cars below however shook Venky; his heart skipped a beat as the vehicles vying for space on a narrow street raced to beat the traffic lights.

“I am sure I hear some of these people even swear at each other”, Venky spoke echoing Aki’s descriptions “see their faces gripped with an unknown fear, and an undefined stress. It’s totally out of sync with nature.”

Aki spoke on, “The south Mumbai traffic rushes back to the suburbs now and while the birds peacefully sleep at night, the humans drown themselves in a whole lot of activity to forget their day’s sorrows. There are the movies, the bars, and the internet, the facebook and the whatsapp and all that myriad distractions. I wonder if this isn’t a desperate attempt to avoid connecting to our own selves. Living in harmony with nature seems to be a rich luxury that while humans can ill afford to have, the birds have earned it free of cost. And we never tire to pompously declare that the humans are the most advanced of all species of life.”

“Do you guys remember our annual pilgrimage to Vrindavan a few years ago?”

The three nodded. How could they ever forget these yatras for the three of them oversaw the accommodation, travel and food arrangements for the thousands of families that participated in these two week spiritual retreats.

“The managers were racking their brains on how they could organize lunch serving for four thousand plus members of our congregation without agitating the monkeys. The monkeys seem to be everywhere in Vrindavan, and they are notorious in grabbing food, and even other possessions of humans like glasses, purses, and handbags, all in a desperate attempt to get some food. But this worry never bothered you guys, our yatra bosses during dinner time. None of the monkeys would venture near the kitchen area, not one monkey came to snatch the dinner plate or any other eatable from any of our members. In fact there was no security during dinner time, and the monkeys, if they wanted to, could have worked a few extra hours and grabbed a big feast. But the arrival of sunset, and they have a strong discipline; they unfailingly switch off all their activities. No temptations of food could deter them from their happy rest”

The three of them spontaneously laughed. The monkeys had indeed remained quiet during dinner, but the purport that Aki made now never occurred to the trio.

“Ironically in Mumbai, as the neon signs on the road get activated, and the clock strikes seven p.m, humans, in stark contrast to the uncivilized monkeys, passionately busy themselves in a whole lot of activities. And as the birds happily wake to greet the rising sun, the pinkish hue of the early daylight, the gentle breeze from the ocean and the fragrance of the kadamba flowers is lost to the humans. We have no time to admire the sunrise or ponder over where our life is heading, as the challenges of yet another day stares at our face. We rush to work, grabbing a sandwich, and munching or even swallowing it while simultaneously reading the paper, answering the mails, talking to our spouse, and dressing ourselves. And then if you do feel peaceful walking on the sea shore, or stroll in a natural forest like what we are doing, that’s dismissed as a mere aberration.

“The whole world outside of our ashram is busy earning money, and they’d goad you on to join the mad rat race. And surely you wouldn’t want to feel guilty for not being part of it. But who’s winning this race? Who cares! Just keep running, and even if you win you still remain a rat. Or maybe a rat is better off; he’s got to worry only the cat, but we have to worry hundreds of other predators- the two legged, well dressed, sophisticated, and polished humans.”

Venky and others shared a prolonged silence. Slowly they rose and walked to the bus stop. They were now retreating back to the monastery. As half dozen parrots flew back to their giant residence at the peepal, the light grey barks rustled at the slightest breeze. Venky looked up at the birds and spoke aloud to no one in particular, “I think this is a beautiful dance. The birds surely have an affluent life in South Mumbai.”

“I am remembering Mr Parekh; maybe like the Buddha who attained enlightenment also under the peepal tree, he could spend some time contrasting his life with these simple birds; surely they could teach us a valuable lesson in simple and happy living”

To be continued…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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